The European Association of Science Editors (EASE) is an international community of individuals and associations from diverse backgrounds, linguistic traditions and professional experience in science communication and editing.

Shirin Heidari on Why Sex and Gender Matter in Research

Watch Shirin Heidari, founding chair of EASE Gender Policy Committee, present a TEDx talk discussing how scientific research has turned a blind eye on gender blind research.

Shirin provides some fascinating examples about the harmful implications of this gender bias, shares some insights into medical research, and offers a path to change the paradigm towards unbiased research that can apply to all genders.

–  Saturday 12th May, 2018  –

The gendered system of academic publishing: EASE GPC in the Lancet

Members of the EASE Gender Policy Committee have published an article in The Lancet, addressing “the gendered system of academic publishing”, suggesting that it “is both a reflection and a cause of women’s under-representation and disadvantage in other areas of the scientific enterprise.”

In addition to summarising current developments in gender issues within the publishing community (such as the self-report from Nature and 2015 study of Obstetrics & Gynecology), the article discusses outcomes from a workshop held in November under the title; Gender Equality in Academic Publishing: Challenges and Opportunities in Health Journals. The workshop looked at “identifying strategies to improve gender equity in peer review and publication processes.”

The article is free to access from the journal here

Details of the work and impact of our Gender Policy Committee, including the SAGER Guidelines, can be found on their dedicated pages on the EASE site here.

The gendered system of academic publishing
Lundine, Jamie et al.
The Lancet , Volume 391 , Issue 10132 , 1754 – 1756
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30950-4

– Tuesday 8th May, 2018 –

New APA Reporting Standards


Following a review of existing reporting standards, the American Psychological Association has published a paper which sets out revisions to existing standards, and adding new sets which address current positions and knowledge.

Changes to existing standards have been made to the meta-analysis section, and in the hypotheses, analyses, and conclusions, dividing them into 3 groupings (primary, secondary, and exploratory). Some new modules found in this version include standards for observational studies, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, and replication studies.

We recommend that all journal publishers, editors, authors and reviewers in the psychological sciences field read these, incorporate them as best practice guidelines in assessing papers for publication, and for all researchers to reference when designing and reporting their work.

The paper can be accessed for free here: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-00750-002

Full reference:

Appelbaum, M., Cooper, H., Kline, R. B., Mayo-Wilson, E., Nezu, A. M., & Rao, S. M. (2018). Journal article reporting standards for quantitative research in psychology: The APA Publications and Communications Board task force report. American Psychologist, 73(1), 3-25.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000191

 

–  Monday 22nd January, 2018 –

More steps towards transparency in research publishing

An Editorial published in Nature in September presented some “Steps towards transparency in research publishing” (Nature 2017;549(431), doi: 10.1038/549431a)

The Editorial discusses how progress in the transparency of both research and editorial processes is gathering pace, discussing five forms of transparency documented in a project overseen by Malcolm Macleod of the University of Edinburgh.

In addition to the positive steps, the Editorial also poses questions about the risks involved in opening up, considering whether transparency could give rise to a different sort of bias; for example, some authors do not want to know who authored a positive peer review, so that they can avoid future positive peer review bias themselves.

https://www.nature.com/news/steps-towards-transparency-in-research-publishing-1.22661

COPE introduce Core Practices

COPE has recently replaced its “Code of Conduct for Editors” with “Core Practices”.

The reasons COPE provide for these changes are stated on its website, as being that the guidelines were criticised for being overly specific in some areas and not specific enough in others.

It goes on to explain that the core practices have radically simplified the expectations of how all parties will act, and seeks to provide a framework which references the resources available on the COPE website.

Another recent change is the introduction of institutional membership which is being piloted with five institutions.

A discussion of these changes can be read on Scholarly Kitchen.

– Posted: Wednesday 13th December, 2017 –